Health

The cornerstone of life and success. Often ignored and taken for granted, but at one’s peril.

Let’s talk health.

What naturally springs to mind is physical health. This comprises of eating well and getting enough physical exercise. For me, I ride my push bike to work and around town, and I eat a mostly vegetarian diet with a little bit of fish.

But there are other areas of life requiring a watchful eye and some sort of strategy.

Mental health is important, especially when there are mental illnesses and dementia lurking in the future if not handled correctly. One strategy is to do mental puzzles or a hobby such as writing.

Emotional health also is worthy of a mention. Making connections within family, friend networks, and the community can protect from isolation and loneliness. And it can be as simple as asking the person at the cash register how their day has been.

But the real area that ties all these together is our shared spiritual health. I’m not talking about what church or religion one belongs too. I’m talking morals, ethics and a vision for one’s own life.

Committing to a vision larger than I am is something that gets me out of bed and keeps me striving forward. Shared with my employer, my family and friends, and my community, this vision keeps me empowered.

What is your vision?

How are you looking after every facet of your health?

A new leaf

“I hate you!” I slammed the door shut in my Mother’s face.

She continued to knock. “Cynthia, I’m sorry.” I could hear the tears in her voice. She always cried at times like this, so I was immune to it. I didn’t want her to get her own way.

I put on the dowdy black dress that I had worn to my Grandfather’s funeral, finding heels to match and a black scarf should I need to hide my tears from my relatives.

Footsteps disappeared down the hallway and I knew that my Mother had left me.

After a few minutes, I strode in what I thought was a confident manner, out of my bedroom, down the hallway, and into the kitchen. My Mother was finding her keys in her handbag.

“Are you ready now Cynthia?” she asked in a voice that hid so much hurt.

I flounced out of the kitchen door and into the sunlight, deciding to not say a word to her.

In silence, my Mother drove me to the cemetery. Other cars, many of which I recognised as belonging to various Aunts, Uncles and Cousins, crowded into the car park when we arrived.

There was a gathering in the little church in amongst the gravestones. My Nanna’s coffin sat in the middle, surrounded by flowers. The orchids in the flower arrangements reminded me of my Grandfather who had grown them in the greenhouse, and I felt my resolve not to cry start to break down. Being the eldest Grandchild, it was soon my turn to lead my Cousins in our bit of the service.

I held it together, but only just.
We all stumbled out of the dark church and back into the beautiful sunlit day. The sound of quiet weeping filled my ears as I followed the coffin.

At the graveside, as the coffin started to descend, I burst into tears. All the grief I had held onto melted as my beloved Nanna departed from view.

My Mother was standing nearby, watching me.

I walked over to her and put my arm around her shoulders. I realised that I loved her despite our fights, and I was determined to make sure I never said those nasty words to her from now on.