Forming caring relationships

I’m not an expert.

I’ve just made it to middle age with a support network made of people from all ages and walks of life.

But I’ve learnt over the years how to do this. I was not born such a social butterfly.

If you’re working on establishing a rapport with someone, start with good eye contact. And then compliment them. Nothing creepy, just a comment on how they have a nice smile or how you like their boots.

And if nervous, tell them. Be upfront. Be honest. People love and tend to respond well to a little honest vulnerability and imperfection.

Then strike up conversation. Mention why you’re in the building or waiting in the queue, if appropriate.

If all else fails, talk about the weather.

And if you see them again, say hi.

You may have just made a friend.

Legacy and friendship

When considering what legacy to leave behind, it is sometimes useful to watch what legacy your friends and own family are leaving behind.

For a clue as to what is really valuable, think about the glue that holds these people in your life.

Is it your religion. Or that you all like to garden, or volunteer.

The themes that run through your closest relationships indicate what your values are.

They also point to what would be valuable to those you care the most about in your life.

And therefore these values can provide a foundation for determining what to centre your legacy around. And for who would benefit from it.

Cauliflower Soup

This week, you, my faithful follower, would have noticed I’m a little late in posting.

It’s for a good reason.

Friends have spent the past ten weeks outside of Australia, travelling abroad, and they only returned home over the weekend. So, last night, instead of slaving over the keyboard, developing a post for this week, I was having dinner at their place and being regaled with lots of tales from their adventures.

From buying discounted clothing in Dubai to having a pub lunch in Cornwall, they entertained me.

But not only that, they also made the most scrumptious meal from a cauliflower.

My friend is a brilliant cook, and this is what she whipped up:

Ingredients:

1 brown onion, diced

1 large garlic clove, finely chopped

5 medium potatoes

1 cauliflower

2L vegetable stock

salt and pepper

nutmeg

cream

butter

Method:

  1. fry onion in melted butter until soft

  2. Add garlic. Cook further 1-2 mins.

  3. Chop cauliflower roughly. Chop 5 medium sized white fleshed potatoes roughly.

  4. Add potatoes to pan and boil 15 mins. Add cauliflower and 2 litres of vegetable stock salt pepper and nutmeg.

  5. Bring back to boil. Cover and reduce heat and simmer for. about 2 hrs. May need to add more water.

  6. Season to taste. Allow to cool. Blend until smooth.

  7. Stir in 1 carton of cream and heat gently.

It’s a lovely way to use cauliflower. Since they’re in season at the moment, they can be picked up in my home town for as little as $1 per head. This makes this particular recipe incredibly cheap to make, and the quantities, last night, fed three people with enough for left overs. Especially with a bread roll, this is hard to beat on a cold Winter’s night.