Personal Motto

Hello,

Do you have a personal motto?

A little mantra that keeps you pressing forward each day?

An affirmation?

Well, the main character of my book has one. It is “Never give up.”

If you’d like to find out what happens, order a book via direct messaging me.

Thanks,

Elizabeth

Aunthood

All my life I’ve been upset by the way Dad spoke to me when we used to work together.

To gain my attention he would whistle to me. And it made me feel like a dog being given commands.

Until tonight.

I was at my sister’s house with my 2 year old nephew.

So, what did I do when he tried to follow me outside the house in the dark?

I clicked my fingers and said, “Inside.”

What’s wrong with this?

It’s precisely how I tell my dog to get inside.

I now understand Dad much better.

I’ve not been an Aunt for all that long and am still learning.

Dad hadn’t had a teen daughter for all that long either.

So, Dad, it’s all forgiven.

Water

Now, you may be wondering why I’ve titled this post, simply Water.

A few years ago, I read a book called “The Colour of Water.” James McBride is the author.

Much of the book has been forgotten, not due to the author’s lack of talent, but more because of the progress of time.

The bit that stands out for me the most, is the bit where James asks his Mum,
“What is the colour of Spirit?”

Her answer is “The colour of water.”

I’ve never heard such a beautiful way of putting it.

Spirit runs through the Earth like water. It rushes through both the Natural World and through Human Made Constructions.

Today, Spirit felt much like water. I was reflecting on time, and how it rushes out of one’s hands as soon as one realises that it is passing.

There are a couple of activities that make time stand still for me, that provide a temporary respite from fast moving time.

These are jogging, writing and spending time with dear friends and family.

Jogging ties me to the premeval task of staying alive. Our ancestors stayed alive and moved from place to place by running or jogging.

Being a Writer ties me to my childhood. I loved all things creative, as a child. I curtailed my drawing so I could better write. Writing is always my first love… always has been…always will be.

And then there’s time spent with my loved ones. Once a week, I make the dusty drive to my Mentor and Best Friend’s house. We savour cups of coffee together, sometimes enjoy meals of Fish and Chips, and always enjoy our conversations. I find her wise, entertaining and clever… and being a fellow Writer, we mercilessly tease each other with word play.

So, may Spirit, regardless of the form that it takes, be with you, and may we continue to build this life together.

Motherhood

For those of you who know me, you’ll be wondering why I’m writing about Motherhood.

Well it’s simple really.

There are many ways to share the journey of Motherhood, and only one of these involve being pregnant.

Motherhood is tied to Aunthood. An Aunty is someone who has a close famial relationship with her sister or brother’s children. It’s almost being a Mum as the Aunty role is a potentially pivotal role in the child’s life.

And then there is the Person in the Community role. That person who notices the child and is also in a nurturing role. Think of the school teacher, or kindly neighbour. These people are also important.

In my opinion, Motherhood has been reduced in a way. Because, to me, there are other ways that such a role can be partaken in.

To me, Motherhood is more about emotional maturity and taking an active role in the development of a child into adulthood.

So to all the Aunts, teachers, neighbours and friends of young people…

…this Post is all about you!

Forming caring relationships

I’m not an expert.

I’ve just made it to middle age with a support network made of people from all ages and walks of life.

But I’ve learnt over the years how to do this. I was not born such a social butterfly.

If you’re working on establishing a rapport with someone, start with good eye contact. And then compliment them. Nothing creepy, just a comment on how they have a nice smile or how you like their boots.

And if nervous, tell them. Be upfront. Be honest. People love and tend to respond well to a little honest vulnerability and imperfection.

Then strike up conversation. Mention why you’re in the building or waiting in the queue, if appropriate.

If all else fails, talk about the weather.

And if you see them again, say hi.

You may have just made a friend.

Healing relationships

Relationships form a delicate web across the globe. From dolphins and their interactions with each other to the role ants play in keeping the cycles of a rainforest turning, to the big human cities, we are all inter-related.

On a personal level, these relationships exist between members of a family, colleagues in a business and all kinds of social arenas.

So we may as well get along.

When a hurt has been witnessed by a relationship, three options lie available.

We can tear ourselves apart and continue at war with each other. This follows the “eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth” logic. But this just causes more conflict.

Or we can liberate ourselves from this cycle. There are two options branching out of this. We can choose to stay and repair, like with a family member we love dearly.

Or we can choose to walk away.

With any decision, it must be made with a wise heart. At the end of the day, we’re the ones who are left to live with our decisions.

Let’s choose peace. Let’s choose to live in a world with out violence and war.

Let’s choose to embrace the goal of healing our relationships.

Support

Support comes in many forms and in many guises. And it can come from any quarter. Sometimes, it can come from the most unlikely of sources.

I’m cruising towards the Renaissance years, where one realises that one doesn’t have to care so much because most people are more concerned about themselves. And not me.

But over my lifetime I’ve been supported by all sorts of people from all corners of my life.

And in this article, I’ll give a positive story about a person who practices a religion that I’m not well informed about.

Iftekar was a Sri Lankan Muslim who I worked with twenty years ago. I was 21. He was probably in his 40s. His reason for working was to support his wife in her studies to become a General Practitioner.

Normally, I steer clear of the three Abrahamic religions, even though I was raised Catholic. And I attend Bible study with the local Uniting Church.

But in my hour of need, Iftekar stepped in and played mentor and role model, and friend. This was important as I was a very socially wayward and awkward young person.

We didn’t talk religion. We just talked.

So, before I write off someone because of their background, I’ll remember Iftekar and what he taught me.

My hope is that this story will further cause walls to come down, regardless of the side that you find yourself on.

Spread the tolerance. Spread the love.